The Importance of Supervisor Training in Maintaining a Safe and Productive Workplace

Posted by: kevensteinberg
Category: Employment Law

Great supervisors are important to workplaces because they can often help elevate the performance of workers and help encourage workers to perform their jobs to the best of their abilities. It is important for business owners to understand that not all people have the necessary leadership skills to act as supervisors, so training is highly recommended.

A supervisory management training program can be beneficial because it not only helps companies retain their employees and remain competitive, but it can also help keep companies out of the courtroom. Any company that needs assistance creating such a program will want to speak to an experienced Los Angeles small business attorney.

Employer Liability for Supervisors

The primary reason that most companies will want to invest in training their supervisors is because of the possible legal consequences of not doing so. Companies will be wise to consider all of the many antidiscrimination laws enforced by the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which include:

  • Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex. It also makes it illegal for a company to retaliate against a person because they complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. 
  • The Pregnancy Discrimination Act makes it illegal to discriminate against a woman because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.
  • The Equal Pay Act of 1963 (EPA) makes it illegal to pay different wages to men and women if they perform equal work in the same workplace. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.
  • The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) protects people who are 40 years of age or older from discrimination because of their age. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.
  • Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) makes it illegal to discriminate against a qualified person with a disability in the private sector and in state and local governments. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The law requires employers to reasonably accommodate the known physical or mental limitations of an otherwise qualified individual with a disability who is an applicant or employee, unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the operation of the employer’s business.
  • Sections 102 and 103 of the Civil Rights Act of 1991 amends Title VII and the ADA to permit jury trials and compensatory and punitive damage awards in intentional discrimination cases.
  • Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 makes it illegal to discriminate against a qualified person with a disability in the federal government. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The law also requires that employers reasonably accommodate the known physical or mental limitations of an otherwise qualified individual with a disability who is an applicant or employee, unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the operation of the employer’s business.
  • The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) makes it illegal to discriminate against employees or applicants because of genetic information, which includes information about an individual’s genetic tests and the genetic tests of an individual’s family members, as well as information about any disease, disorder or condition of an individual’s family members. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.

Possible Training Benefits

Companies that invest in training supervisors can enjoy many different kinds of benefits. Some supervisors can be trained how to use newer technology and equipment so they are able to know how to do so in the most effective ways possible.

A supervisor can also develop skills and knowledge that help them make their work even more productive. Training may also help supervisors communicate with employees better and create more of a team environment.

Supervisors need to understand when this training is required by law, and adhere to all proper legal practices so employees will follow them as well. They should also be comfortable with organizational policies used by companies and all laws impacting employment.

Companies will want supervisors to understand all applicable and relevant laws relating to their jobs. There can be a connection between training and company productivity and growth.

Contact Our Los Angeles Small Business Attorney

If you need assistance figuring out a way to help train your supervisors, do not be afraid to seek legal help. Steinberg Law understands these kinds of concerns and can help companies all over California be compliant with state and federal law. 

Our firm has helped scores of businesses all over the Golden State. You can call (818) 855-1103 or contact our Los Angeles small business attorney online for a free consultation.

Author: kevensteinberg